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Apart from the EOS 7D Mark II, all current APS-C format Canon DSLRs are sold with the option of an included ‘kit’ zoom lens. In many cases, you can choose between Canon’s latest 18-55mm or 18-135mm lenses, both of which give solid performance and come complete with image stabilization and virtually silent STM (Stepping Motor) autofocus systems, ideal for both stills and video capture. But a basic standard zoom will only get you so far.

Even with the generous 1.6x focal length multiplier or ‘crop factor’ of Canon EOS APS-C format bodies, the 18-135mm kit lens comes up short in telephoto reach for shooting action sports and wildlife. And both kit lenses lack a seriously wide viewing angle for some landscape and interior shots. You might also need a tight depth of field to blur the background in portraiture and still life images, something the relatively narrow widest apertures of kit lenses struggle to deliver. Another popular lens option is a ‘macro’ optic for shooting extreme close-ups.

The biggest bonus of any interchangeable lens camera is that you can fit the ideal lens for the job at hand, from ultra-wide zoom to super-telephoto, and fast primes in between. In fact, sometimes full-frame-compatible lenses are a better option than dedicated APS-C format lenses.

Lens designations

It’s actually worth getting the designations of lenses clear at this point. Canon’s EF (Electro-Focus) lens mount dates back to 1987 and the 35mm film era. The EF-S variant was launched in 2003, to suit Canon DSLRs with smaller, APS-C image sensors. There are no issues using EF lenses on APS-C format cameras, but you can’t use an EF-S lens on a full-frame DSLR. The classifications used by Sigma are DC (APS-C) and DG (full-frame) and for Tamron it’s Di-II (APS-C) and Di (full-frame).

We’ve put all of the main contenders through their paces with rigorous lab testing and shooting in all manner of ‘real-world’ scenarios

If you’ve got a Canon camera, it might seem sensible to use Canon lenses. However, third-party lenses from the likes of Sigma and Tamron often give similar or even better performance than own-brand Canon lenses, and at more competitive prices.   

We’ve put all of the main contenders in the various categories through their paces with rigorous lab testing and shooting in all manner of ‘real-world’ scenarios. Based on the results, here’s our list of the 10 best lenses to buy for your Canon APS-C format body. We’ve included outright winners in each category, as well as best-value alternatives to suit a tighter budget. 

A major upgrade from Tamron’s original 10-24mm lens, the new ‘VC HLD’ edition adds image stabilization and a new autofocus system, which is quicker and quieter. Handling is also improved, because the focus ring no longer rotates during autofocus. The good-quality build includes weather seals and a keep-clean fluorine coating on the front element. Image quality benefits from good sharpness and contrast, along with well-contained distortions for an ultra-wide zoom lens, and fairly minimal color fringing. 

Great-value option: Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM 

Not much more than a third of the price of the Tamron 10-24mm, this is a top-value buy. It matches the Tamron’s maximum viewing angle, includes image stabilization and has a compact, lightweight build that’s well matched to bodies like the EOS Rebel T6 / 1300D and EOS Rebel SL2 / 200D

We’ve got so used to autofocus that a lens which you can only focus manually might sound like a retrograde step. However, the huge depth of field enabled by a lens with such a short focal length makes accurate focusing less critical. Better still, the Samyang’s distance scale enables you try traditional focusing methods for landscape and street photography, like setting the hyperfocal distance and ‘zone focusing’. Smart design and high-quality glass help to ensure good image quality, while nano-structure coatings help to keep ghosting and flare to a minimum. 

Great-value option: N/A

Wide-angle prime lenses for APS-C format cameras are practically non-existent. Canon does make an EF-S 24mm pancake lens but, taking the crop factor into account, it’s more ‘standard’ than ‘wide-angle’. 

Now more than a decade old, this was the first enthusiast/pro-grade EF-S standard zoom lens Canon produced. It’s still the best, and the only one to feature a fast and constant (meaning it's available throughout the entire zoom range) f/2.8 aperture. It’s also the most expensive standard zoom for APS-C format Canon cameras, and has enthusiast-friendly features like ring-type ultrasonic autofocus and a focus distance scale beneath a viewing window. Even so, it’s not one of Canon’s L-series (Luxury) lenses, and has no weather seals. Frustratingly, as with the vast majority of non-L-series Canon lenses, you need to buy the lens hood separately. 

Great-value option: Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM | C 

Relatively compact and lightweight, this Sigma has a variable yet fairly fast aperture rating and delivers impressive image quality, at a bargain price. 

Whereas most APS-C format cameras have a 1.5x crop factor, Canon’s is a little more aggressive at 1.6x, and that makes this Sigma 30mm a particularly good fit as a ‘standard prime’, as its effective focal length works out to 48mm, only marginally short of the preferred 50mm. As one of Sigma’s recent ‘Art’ class lenses, it’s beautifully built and boasts a fast f/1.4 aperture rating. This not only enables fast shutter speeds under low lighting, without needing to push your ISO setting too far, but delivers a fairly tight depth of field, even taking the relatively short ‘actual’ focal length into account. Image quality is very impressive in all respects and, for such a ‘fast’ lens, sharpness remains excellent even at the widest available aperture. Autofocus is also fast, thanks to a rear-focusing mechanism that drives the smaller, rear elements of the lens via a ring-type ultrasonic system. The front element therefore neither extends nor rotates during focusing.

Great-value option: Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM

Unfeasibly small and lightweight, this ‘pancake’ lens measures less than an inch in length and tips the scales at a mere 125g. It doesn’t have a very fast aperture, at f/2.8, but image quality is very good and it’s a great little prime for traveling light, with an ‘effective’ focal length of 38.4mm on APS-C cameras, which is a good compromise between a wide-angle and standard lens.

Canon’s only real ‘superzoom’ lens for APS-C format cameras is the EF-S 18-200mm, which is about 10 years old, has a rather basic autofocus system, and is frankly a bit of a disappointment. This Tamron lens is a much more attractive option. It’s unique among superzoom lenses in shrinking to 16mm rather than the usual 18mm at the short end of its zoom range. A couple of millimeters might not sound much, but the extra wide-angle potential is very noticeable in practice. There’s no skimping at the long end either, with a generous 300mm maximum focal length, far outstripping the Canon. Unusually for a PZD (Piezo Drive) ultrasonic autofocus system (which relies on a small motor rather than a ring-type arrangement), the focus ring remains fixed during autofocus and adds a manual override facility. The only real downside is that, like most superzoom lenses, sharpness drops off a little at the long end of the zoom range, and barrel distortion is quite pronounced at the short end.

Great-value option: Tamron 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC

Remarkably compact and lightweight for a superzoom, the new edition of Tamron’s 18-200mm makes an excellent all-in-one ‘travel lens’, and is unbeatable value at the price.

Compared with budget 50mm lenses, such as the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM, this one is a lot more expensive. Indeed, it’s also pricier than Canon’s faster f/1.4 lens. However, the Tamron is really nicely made, and boasts an optical stabilizer that’s lacking in both Canon 50mm lenses, and most others from the likes of Sigma. It’s full-frame compatible but gives an effective focal length of 72mm on APS-C cameras, ideal for portraiture. As such, bokeh is important, and it’s here that Tamron strikes gold, with defocused areas having a deliciously smooth and creamy appearance, while in-focus areas retain good sharpness.

Great-value option: Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM

The STM (Stepping Motor) edition of Canon’s EF 50mm f/1.8 lens is much better built than its predecessors, with a metal rather than plastic mounting plate, a more well-rounded aperture based on seven diaphragm blades instead of five, and a more refined autofocus system. Image quality is essentially as good as from Canon’s more upmarket 50mm f/1.4 lens, making the f/1.8 STM unbeatable value at the price.

Not to be confused with the preceding Tamron 90mm macro lens of the same name (which had a gold ring around the barrel), this one adds higher-grade glass, dual nano-structure coatings, improved weather seals and a fluorine coating on the front element. More importantly, it has a redesigned autofocus system that’s optimized for close-up shooting, and a new ‘hybrid’ optical stabilizer that counteracts axial shift (up-down or side-to-side movement) as well as the usual angular vibration (wobble). In this respect, it’s similar to Canon’s range-topping EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens, but in our tests the Tamron had the edge for image quality, and it's less expensive to buy. 

Great-value option: Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro

It lacks the Tamron’s hybrid stabilization system and weather seals, but has refined handling and delivers superb image quality, all at a knockdown price.

When it comes to telephoto zooms, there’s a lot to be said for buying a full-frame compatible 70-300mm lens. They tend to still be manageably compact and lightweight, and you’ll be cherry-picking the best image quality from the centre of the frame when using a camera with a smaller, APS-C image sensor; and naturally, should you upgrade to a full-frame body in the future you’ll also be able to continue using the lens. This Tamron is a great example of the breed. It has very good build quality, complete with weather seals, and delivers impressive image quality. Further plus points include fast and whisper-quiet ring-type ultrasonic autofocus with the usual manual override, and an effective image stabilizer. Sharpness and contrast are very good throughout the entire zoom range, although, as is typical with telephoto zooms, sharpness does drop off a little at 300mm. 

Great-value option: Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM

Designed exclusively for APS-C cameras, this Canon lens is refreshingly compact and lightweight for a telephoto zoom, although part of the weight-saving is due to it having a plastic rather than metal mounting plate. As with other STM lenses, the stepping motor autofocus system works well for both stills and movies. Sharpness is good throughout the zoom range, even when shooting wide-open, and the image stabilizer is worth about three stops.

So-called ‘fast’ telephoto zooms tend to be fairly big and heavy, with the 70-200mm f/2.8 lenses often favored by pro photographers weighing in at around 1.5kg – that’s a lot of weight to hang off the front of a small APS-C format body like a EOS Rebel SL2 / 200D or EOS Rebel T7i / 800D. An f/stop slower, this lens still offers a constant aperture of f/4 throughout the zoom range, along with L-series trapping like pro-grade build quality, weather seals and optical excellence, but it's a much more manageable package – indeed, it’s only about half the weight of most 70-200mm f/2.8 zooms. Sharpness and contrast are superb, boosted by the use of top-notch fluorite and UD (Ultra-low Dispersion) elements, and the ring-type ultrasonic autofocus system is super-fast.

Great-value option: Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM

A great bargain buy, the Sigma has the faster, often favored f/2.8 aperture rating and is a very good performer, although it lacks weather seals.

Sigma has a history of pushing the envelope when it comes to super-telephoto reach, and this 150-600mm delivers a spectacular effective focal length of 960mm at the longest end of its zoom range when used on an APS-C format Canon body. Even so, its physical size isn’t too monstrous, and it weighs less than 2kg, making it nearly a kilogram lighter than Sigma’s 150-600mm Sport lens. It features many of the same design flourishes as its bigger sibling, including dual, switchable autofocus modes for auto or manual priority, dual-mode stabilization for static and panning shots, and a dual-position autofocus range limiter that can lock out either the short or long end of the range. It also features the same zoom lock mechanism, which enables you to lock the zoom length at any marked (numbered) position between 150mm and 600mm. Performance is very good, from sharpness, contrast and other optical attributes to autofocus speed, stabilization and handling. Overall, it’s a top buy that’s ideal for maximizing your telephoto reach on Canon APS-C format bodies.

Great-value option: Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM | C

The maximum focal length is comparatively modest but Sigma’s new Contemporary class super-telephoto zoom is wonderfully compact and lightweight, making prolonged handheld shooting less of a strain.

Posted: February 16, 2018, 3:31 pm

Ultra-wide zoom lenses are the thick end of the wedge, at least when it comes to viewing angles. With zoom ranges starting at just 8mm for APS-C format lenses, and 11mm or 12mm for full-frame, you can shoehorn vast areas of a scene into the image frame. It’s great for shooting sweeping landscapes or architecture, and arguably even more useful when shooting indoors, where space is limited and your back’s up against the wall.

Another key attraction of ultra-wide lenses is that you can create images with extraordinary perspective effects. Get in close to the main subject in a scene and you can massively exaggerate its relative size, against a shrunken and rapidly receding background. Parallel lines appear to converge at alarming rates and shots generally get a proper wow factor.

Another bonus is that short focal lengths equate to huge depths of field. Unlike in portraiture, where it’s often favourable to blur the background, wide-angle lenses enable you to keep very close subjects and the distant horizon simultaneously sharp.

Distortion effects

Some lenses deliver a 180-degree viewing angle but these are curvilinear or ‘fisheye’ optics. They’re renowned for their extreme barrel distortion. By contrast, all of the lenses in this round-up are rectilinear, aiming to keep distortions to a minimum. 

It’s sometimes said that photographers often only use this type of lens at or near its shortest focal length. However, many ultra-wide zooms give almost no distortion at mid-range to long zoom settings. You can therefore enjoy much less distortion towards the long end of the zoom range, especially compared with using a ‘standard’ zoom lens at a matching focal length.

Most APS-C format ultra-wide zooms have variable aperture ratings, with their widest available apertures shrinking toward the longer end of the zoom range. By contrast, most up-market full-frame lenses are constant-aperture designs, maintaining either f/2.8 or f/4 widest apertures at all available focal lengths. Naturally, combining wide viewing angles with wide aperture ratings requires very large-diameter front elements, especially for full-frame lenses. 

Filter fitment

Especially in the full-frame camp, many ultra-wide lenses have particularly bulbous front elements that protrude from the front of the lens barrel. For physical protection, as well as to reduce ghosting and flare, they therefore have a built-in petal shaped lens hood. The same arrangement is used in the ultra-wide Sigma 8-16mm APS-C format lens. 

A downside is that these designs don’t enable filters or a filter holder to be screwed into the front of the lens barrel. However, Lee Filters markets an SW150 Mark II filter system with custom adaptors to fit various ultra-wide zooms including the Canon 11-24mm, Nikon 14-24mm, Sigma 12-24mm, Tamron 15-30mm and Tokina 16-28mm lenses. This enables you to use neutral density and ND grad filters, popular especially for landscape and architectural photography.

Canon DSLRs with APS-C format image sensors start with entry-level models like the EOS Rebel T7i / 800D, and go right through to bodies like the EOS 7D Mark II at the high end of the enthusiast market. Just as with standard and telephoto zooms, a bonus of the APS-C format is that ultra-wide lenses tend to be more compact and lightweight than equivalent full-frame optics. Here’s our top seven picks, in descending order.

The original Tamron 10-24mm gave the biggest outright zoom range of any ultra-wide lens for APS-C format Canon cameras. This major revamp boasts upgraded optical elements, a new HLD (High/Low toque-modulated Drive) autofocus system and the addition of VC (Vibration Compensation) stabilization. Overall build quality is better as well, with added attractions of a weather-sealed mounting plate and fluorine coating on the front element. The lens comes complete with a hood and is compatible with Tamron’s optional USB docking station, for applying customization and firmware updates. Autofocus is quicker and quieter than in the original lens, and unerringly accurate. Sharpness and contrast are impressive, right down to the very shortest zoom setting, colour fringing is minimal and distortions are well controlled for an ultra-wide zoom. All in all, it’s a top performer.

This lens is newer, bigger and better than Sigma's original 10-20mm. A notable difference is that it has a constant f/3.5 maximum aperture, rather than a variable aperture rating that shrinks at longer zoom settings. It's a high-grade lens with fast and quiet ring-type ultrasonic autofocus and a seven-blade diaphragm. The build is quite chunky, with a comparatively large 82mm filter thread. Sharpness and contrast are excellent, and very consistent throughout the zoom range. Colour fringing is very well controlled, and distortion is only really noticeable towards the shortest end of the zoom range. It’s a superb lens that's great value for money.

For really maximizing your ultra-wide viewing angle, look no further than this Sigma 8-16mm. Compared with most competing lenses that shrink to a 10mm focal length, the subtraction of 2mm at the short end of the zoom range makes a huge difference to the angle of view. Physically, the Sigma 8-16mm is quite long because the hood is built into the lens barrel. Build quality is very good, with a smooth-acting zoom ring and ring-type ultrasonic autofocus system. One downside of the ultra-wide angle of view is that barrel distortion at the short end of the zoom range is more noticeable but this lens is unbeatable for squeezing more into the frame, and for really exaggerating perspective.

Canon has launched several compact, lightweight zoom lenses that feature STM (stepping motor) autofocus and image stabilization. The lightweight theme stretches to the mounting plate, which is made from plastic rather than metal. The STM system delivers fairly rapid autofocus for stills, along with smooth and virtually silent autofocus transitions when shooting movies, while the 'fly by wire' focus ring is smooth and precise in operation. The 10-18mm zoom range makes sense, as it gives a wide angle of view at the short end, and matches the 18mm starting point of standard kit zooms at the long end. Sharpness is good, beating that of Canon's long-established 10-22mm lens at both ends of the zoom range, and it’s much less expensive to buy.

This was the first ‘EF-S’ ultra-wide zoom that Canon launched for its APS-C format DSLRs, and it’s still going strong. Despite the addition of the EF-S 10-18mm IS STM lens to the line-up, the 10-22mm remains the better built and more upmarket option. It feels a quality item, and includes ring-type ultrasonic autofocus, plus a focus-distance scale that’s lacking on the cheaper 10-18mm lens. This can be a big help for setting the hyperfocal distance for maximizing depth of field, and for zone focusing, which is especially popular in street photography. However, the 10-22mm lacks image stabilization and outright sharpness is a little disappointing, especially towards the edges and corners of the image frame.

Tokina’s 11-16mm ultra-wide zoom lens became something of a classic in the early days of APS-C format DSLRs. It delivered very pleasing image quality and had a robust construction, although its outright zoom range was distinctly limited. This newer lens retains the same 11mm shortest focal length, but boosts the longest zoom setting from 16mm to 20mm. A major attraction is the lens’s fast f/2.8 aperture, which remains available throughout the entire zoom range. As a consequence, however, the filter thread is relatively large, at 82mm in diameter. Image quality is good with impressive sharpness, but autofocus is relatively slow and noisy compared with most current lenses. A typical Tokina design feature is that you can slide the focus ring forwards and backwards to engage auto or manual focus modes.

For a long time this has been the official Canon super-wide-angle zoom for its APS-C DSLRs, and although it's now been joined by the new EF-S 10-18mm STM lens, the 10-22mm remains the pricier, more upmarket option. Now 10 years old, the lens still feels like a quality item, and includes ring-type ultrasonic autofocus and a focus-distance scale mounted beneath a viewing window. We have, however, experienced poor sharpness from this lens in the past. The sample we tested this time proved better at the frame centre with apertures around f/8, yet sharpness was still disappointing towards the edges and corners, especially at larger apertures, where vignetting was also noticeable.

With the relentless march of extra megapixels into full-frame image sensors, it’s good to have an ultra-wide zoom that pays attention to detail. Our top seven lenses are mostly recent designs that aim for excellent sharpness, right across the frame and into the corners.

The ‘Art’ edition of Sigma’s 12-24mm lens represents a significant upgrade over the previous Mk II model. The variable f/4-5.6 rating of the older lens has been replaced by a constant f/4 aperture, and the improved optical path includes an extra-large-diameter aspherical element at the front of the lens, along with no less than five top-grade FLD (Fluorite-grade Low Dispersion) elements. Fluorine coatings are applied to the front and rear elements, and the mounting plate is weather-sealed. The ring-type ultrasonic autofocus system has also been uprated, with added torque for faster performance, and the lens is compatible with Sigma’s optional USB Dock for applying customization and firmware updates. As for image quality, the new lens delivers greater sharpness, remarkably little colour fringing and minimal distortions for this type of lens. Overall, it’s a spectacular performer.

Canon markets some superb ultra-wide zoom lenses for its full-frame DSLRs. Until recently, however, the only option shorter than 16mm was the EF 8-15mm f/4, which is a fisheye rather than rectilinear lens. Compared with a 16-35mm lens, the 5mm reduction in minimum focal length has a huge impact on the maximum viewing angle. This is actually the most ‘wide-angle’ zoom you get for Canon full-frame DSLRs. As usual for such an ultra-wide lens, the bulbous front element is shielded by a built-in petal shaped lens hood. A lens cap fits over the hood to protect the precious glass in transport. Handling and image quality are excellent but the Canon loses out slightly to the Sigma 12-24mm Art lens for control over colour fringing and distortion.

This Tamron lens doesn't go quite as wide as the Canon 11-24mm, but it's still wider than most. Tamron has developed a line of 'fast' zoom lenses that have a constant, wide f/2.8 aperture, complete with image stabilization (VC, Vibration Compensation), and this 15-30mm takes the line-up into ultra-wide-angle territory. Other similarities include impressive build quality, a weather-sealed construction and ring-type ultrasonic autofocus. It's a big lens but feels well balanced on Canon full frame bodies from the EOS 6D Mark II to the EOS-1D X Mark II and handling is excellent. Sharpness is exemplary from the centre to the extreme edges of images, throughout the zoom range. Colour fringing is controlled well and the stabilizer gives a four-stop benefit.

On the face of it, the narrower aperture rating of this lens compared to Canon’s 16-35mm f/2.8 might make it seem less desirable, but the weather-sealed build and handling are similarly impressive. Bonuses include a more compact and lightweight form factor, an attachment thread for easy use of filters, and the addition of a four-stop image stabilizer. Centre-sharpness is fabulous throughout the zoom range, even at the widest f/4 aperture. Sharpness is also retained well towards the edges, but drops off a bit more than usual at the extreme corners of the frame. There's very little colour fringing and overall performance is excellent, making this lens a smart buy at the price.

Like other L-series lenses in Canon's ultra-wide line-up, the 16-35mm f/2.8 is robust and features weather-seals. Its ring-type ultrasonic autofocus is fast and quiet, and the zoom and focus rings are silky-smooth in operation. This latest version is optically rather better than the Mark II edition, delivering excellent sharpness across the whole frame, along with superb contrast, even when shooting wide-open at f/2.8. However, sharpness and contrast aren’t significantly improved over the EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM, and that lens also features image stabilization along with a more regular 77mm filter thread, compared with this lens's 82mm thread.

Like most (but not all) of Canon's up-market L-series lenses, this one features weather seals, including a rubber ring around the mounting plate to guard against the ingress of dust and moisture. It's one of the least ‘ultra-wide’ zooms in the line-up but is also the most affordable. Autofocus is very rapid and the manual focus ring is smooth and precise, both in manual focusing mode and during override of autofocus. The action of the zoom ring is similarly smooth. There’s no optical stabilizer in this lens, but sharpness is impressive even at the widest aperture of f/4, which remains available throughout the entire zoom range. There's some vignetting (darkening of image corners) but it's no worse than average for this type of lens, and in-camera corrections are available in recent Canon DSLRs.

This is a large and heavy ultra-wide zoom, typical of those with an f/2.8 constant aperture rating. It employs a GMR (Giant Magnetoresistance) autofocus module which, according to Tokina, gives faster, quieter autofocus. That’s certainly true compared with some of Tokina's older lenses, and this one retains the trademark 'one-touch focus clutch'. It’s essentially a push-pull mechanism coupled to the focus ring, for switching between autofocus and manual focus. Handling and image quality are very good, with high levels of centre sharpness and well-restrained colour fringing, although the corners could be sharper. As with a growing number of competing lenses, there’s a built-in hood but no filter attachment thread.

You need the right tools for any job, and that’s especially true when it comes to ultra-wide zooms for ‘DX’ format Nikon cameras. Thankfully, there’s a healthy selection of lenses on offer that are tailor-made for DSLRs with APS-C format image sensors.

A major revamp of Tamron original 10-24mm lens, this one boasts upgraded optics, a new HLD (High/Low toque-modulated Drive) autofocus system and the addition of VC (Vibration Compensation) stabilization. Overall build quality is better as well, with added attractions of a weather-sealed mounting plate and fluorine coating on the front element. The lens comes complete with a hood and is compatible with Tamron’s optional USB docking station, for applying customization and firmware updates. Autofocus is quicker and quieter than in the original lens, and the focus ring no longer rotates during autofocus. Sharpness and contrast are impressive, right down to the very shortest zoom setting. Colour fringing is minimal and distortions are well controlled for an ultra-wide zoom. All in all, it’s a top performer. One thing to watch out for, however, is that the electromagnetic aperture control system is incompatible with older Nikon DSLRs, including the D1, D2, D40, D40s, D60, D70, D70s, D80, D90, D100, D200, D3000 and D5000.

This lens is newer, bigger and better than Sigma's original 10-20mm. A notable difference is that it has a constant f/3.5 maximum aperture, rather than a variable aperture rating that shrinks at longer zoom settings. It's a high-grade lens with fast and quiet ring-type ultrasonic autofocus. The build is quite chunky, and features a large 82mm filter thread. Sharpness and contrast are excellent, and very consistent throughout the zoom range. Colour fringing is well controlled, and distortion is only really noticeable towards the shortest end of the zoom range. It’s a star buy that's great value for money.

For really maximizing your viewing angle, look no further than this Sigma 8-16mm. Compared with most competing lenses that shrink to a 10mm focal length, the subtraction of 2mm at the short end of the zoom range makes a huge difference. Physically, the Sigma 8-16mm is quite long because the hood is built into the lens barrel. Build quality is very good, with a smooth-acting zoom ring and ring-type ultrasonic autofocus system. One downside of the ultra-wide angle of view is that barrel distortion at the short end of the zoom range is rather noticeable but this lens is unbeatable for squeezing more into the frame, and for really exaggerating perspective.

As with many own-brand lenses from camera manufacturers, the Nikon 10-24mm is expensive compared to independently manufactured lenses with similar specifications. In its favour, this Nikon has a class-leading 2.4x zoom range, which it shares with the Tamron 10-24mm lens. The Nikon's build quality and construction is good, with ring-type ultrasonic autofocus which delivers fast, snappy AF. Handling is excellent. The medium-aperture sharpness is no more impressive than in most other rival lenses, but the Nikon does retain sharpness at wide apertures particularly well, and stays sharp into the corners of the frame. Vignetting is also quite well controlled. If you want to stick with Nikon and want a more affordable alternative, take a look at the new AF-P 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G VR (below).

Comparatively small and only about half the weight of most DX format ultra-wide zooms, this is a smart choice for travel photography. The inclusion of VR stabilization also means that you’re less likely to need to carry a tripod, even for shooting under very dull lighting conditions or indoors. The AF-P (Pulse motor) autofocus system is virtually silent and enables smooth focus transitions during video shooting, as well as fairly speedy performance for stills. However, in many older cameras up to and including the D7000, D5200 and D3200, neither autofocus or manual focus is possible. This budget lens matches the pricier Nikon 10-24mm for sharpness at short to medium zoom settings, but lags behind at 20mm. Colour fringing and barrel distortion are also quite noticeable, unless corrected in-camera or during post-shoot editing.

Tokina’s 11-16mm ultra-wide zoom lens became something of a classic in the early days of APS-C format DSLRs. It delivered very pleasing image quality and had a robust construction, although its outright zoom range was distinctly limited. This newer lens retains the same 11mm shortest focal length, but boosts the longest zoom setting from 16mm to 20mm. Another major attraction is the lens’s fast f/2.8 aperture, which remains available throughout the entire zoom range. As a consequence, however, the filter thread is relatively large, at 82mm in diameter. Image quality is good with impressive sharpness, but autofocus is relatively slow and noisy compared with most current lenses. A typical Tokina design feature is that you can slide the focus ring forwards and backwards to engage auto or manual focus modes.

With a minimum focal length of 12mm, this Tokina lens can't deliver quite such a wide viewing angle as most of its rivals, but it does offer a longer maximum zoom setting. This makes it more of an all-rounder that you could keep on your camera for more of the time. It feels reassuringly robust and has Tokina's recently introduced SD-M (Silent Drive-Module) autofocus, which is based on a GMR (Giant Magneto Resistance) system. It still lacks full-time manual override, but you can quickly switch between AF and MF via a simple push-pull mechanism for the focus ring. The amount of barrel distortion is disappointing at the shortest zoom setting, but it's practically non-existent at the long end of the zoom range. Sharpness is pretty reasonable but not overly impressive.

Nikon’s own-brand lenses are up against some stiff competition when it comes to ultra-wide zooms for FX-format (full-frame) cameras. If you’re upgrading from an APS-C format camera body, you can continue to shoot with a DX-format ultra-wide lens in ‘crop mode’, which only uses the central portion of a full-frame camera’s image sensor, but it’s a poor substitute for shooting with the right format of lens.

The ‘Art’ edition of Sigma’s 12-24mm lens represents a significant upgrade over the previous Mark II model. The variable f/4-5.6 rating of the older lens has been replaced by a constant f/4 aperture, and the improved optical path includes an extra-large-diameter aspherical element at the front of the lens, along with no less than five top-grade FLD (Fluorite-grade Low Dispersion) elements. Fluorine coatings are applied to the front and rear elements, and the mounting plate is weather-sealed. The ring-type ultrasonic autofocus system has also been uprated, with added torque for faster performance, and the lens is compatible with Sigma’s optional USB Dock for applying customization and firmware updates. As for image quality, the new lens delivers greater sharpness, remarkably little colour fringing and minimal distortions for this type of lens. Overall, it’s a spectacular performer.

This is Nikon's top ultra-wide zoom for its full-frame DSLRs. It can’t compete with the Sigma 12-24mm lens for maximum viewing angle, but it’s not very far behind, and has a wider aperture rating of f/2.8. Image quality is superb, with excellent sharpness and contrast throughout the entire zoom range. Colour fringing is minimal, although not quite as negligible as in the Sigma 12-24mm Art lens. Barrel distortion at 14mm is noticeably worse than from the Sigma at its even shorter 12mm focal length. Autofocus performance is similarly rapid in both lenses.

This Tamron lens doesn't go quite as wide as Nikon's 14-24mm, but it's still wider than most. Tamron has developed a line of 'fast' zoom lenses that have a constant, wide f/2.8 aperture, complete with image stabilization (VC, Vibration Compensation), and this 15-30mm takes the line-up into ultra-wide-angle territory. Other similarities include impressive build quality, a weather-sealed construction and ring-type ultrasonic autofocus. It's a big lens but feels well balanced on Nikon full-frame bodies from the D750 to the top-flight D5, and handling is excellent. Sharpness is exemplary from the centre to the extreme edges of images, throughout the zoom range. Colour fringing is controlled well and the stabilizer gives a four-stop benefit.

This was Nikon's first ultra-wide lens to feature image stabilization. It's based on Nikon's second-generation VR (Vibration Reduction) system, and gives a four-stop benefit in beating camera-shake. It can't match the focal range and maximum aperture of the Nikon 14-24mm or Tamron 15-30mm, but it has proved a popular, lighter alternative for landscape photographers – especially as you can easily fit filters via the 77mm attachment thread. Other attractions include ring-type ultrasonic autofocus, a weather-sealed mounting plate and fast, ring-type ultrasonic autofocus which is practically silent and enables full-time manual override. Image quality is good although barrel distortion is very noticeable at the 16mm focal length.

This variable-aperture zoom is smaller and cheaper than the Nikon 14-24mm and 16-35mm lenses, but you lose a little in maximum viewing angle. The lens also lacks the VR (Vibration Reduction) facility of the Nikon 16-35mm lens, although the overall build quality feels of an equally good standard. Another downgrade is that the 18-35mm lens has Nikon's Super Integrated Coating rather than Nano Crystal Coating, but its resistance to ghosting and flare is still pretty good. Chromatic aberration is very well controlled for a lens in this price bracket and fine detail is generally retained well even in the extreme corners of images. Even so, sharpness across the image frame isn't a match for the Nikon 16-35mm at the short end of the zoom range.

This is a large and heavy ultra-wide zoom, typical of those with an f/2.8 constant aperture rating. It employs a GMR (Giant Magnetoresistance) autofocus module which, according to Tokina, gives faster, quieter autofocus. That’s certainly true compared with some of Tokina's older lenses, and this one retains the trademark 'one-touch focus clutch'. It’s essentially a push-pull mechanism coupled to the focus ring, for switching between autofocus and manual focus. Handling and image quality are very good, with high levels of centre sharpness and well-restrained colour fringing, although the corners could be sharper. As with a growing number of competing lenses, there’s a built-in hood but no filter attachment thread.

Posted: February 15, 2018, 12:15 pm

Fujifilm has announced the X-H1, its new flagship X Series mirrorless camera that sits above both the X-T2 and X-Pro2.

Aimed at professional photographers and videographers, the X-H1 is the first X Series camera to feature in-body image stabilization (IBIS for short). 

Together with a specially developed dual-processor, the new 5-axis IBIS provides up to a maximum of 5.5 stops of image stabilization when used with all XF lenses that don't include optical image stabilization (OIS) technology. 

Fujifilm has also refined the way in which the image stabilization system is manufactured. A laser measurement device is used to control component flatness and position with twice the precision of standard components, while a new spring mechanism has been included to reduce micro-vibrations caused by operation of the mechanical shutter.

The X-H1 may have a new IS system, but Fujifilm has stuck with the 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III sensor that's impressed in many recent Fujifilm cameras including the X-T2 and X100F

Ready for anything

The X-H1 is both dust and water-resistant, and can operate in temperatures as low as -10°C. It's similar to the X-T2 in those respects, but to underline its pro credentials the X-H1 also uses a 25% thicker magnesium alloy compared to the X-T2.

Fujifilm has also revealed that it's modified the structure for attaching the lens mount, resulting in a more compact size and lighter weight body than if it had stuck to the previous design, while the X-H1 also sports a high-quality scratch-resistant coating.

Like the larger, medium-format GFX 50S, the X-H1 sports a small top plate 1.28-inch LCD that displays key shooting information. Its arrival means there’s no place for a dedicated exposure compensation dial – something that's become a bit of a design trait of Fujifilm cameras. We found the fiddly little button that replaced it on the GFX 50S a bit awkward to use, so hopefully this has been refined on the X-H1.

Fujifilm hasn't skimped on the viewfinder for the X-H1 either, with a 3.69-million dot resolution and a large and bright 0.75x magnification. The display also promises to be incredibly smooth, with a display time lag of just 0.005 seconds and a frame rate of 100fps. 

As we first saw on the X-T2, the X-H1 features a three-direction, double-jointed 3.0-inch rear display, allowing you to pull the screen outwards and away from the body when the camera is tilted on its side as well as when shooting in landscape format. The X-H1 also gains touchscreen functionality.

Listening to feedback

Fujifilm has always been very good at listening to feedback from photographers and channeling this into future models, and it's done so again with the X-H1. 

The X-H1 sports a larger handgrip design than the X-T2, and also features a new leaf-spring switch for the shutter release button. This has been designed to give a stable feel when holding the camera, as well as to facilitate easy operation of the shutter release.

The X-H1 now features a dedicated AF-On button at the rear of the camera

Back-button focusing is a technique that many photographers swear by, so the X-H1 now features a dedicated AF-On button at the rear of the camera, allowing autofocus to be activated with the thumb. There's also a dedicated focus lever, while many of the X-H1's buttons on the rear of the camera have been enlarged over previous models. 

Extensive video features

While Fujifilm doesn't want the X-H1 to be seen as a video-first camera, as the Panasonic Lumix GH5 is, the new camera does sport a comprehensive set of video features. It's capable of shooting DCI 4K (4096 xPanasonic Lumix GH5 2160) at 24p and 4K (3840 x 2160) at 30p, and can also shoot at 120p in Full HD. 

With the ability to record at a high bit rate of 200Mbps, the X-H1 can shoot F-log, and also offers a 400% dynamic range setting (approximately 12 stops). There's also a new ETERNA film simulation setting that Fujifilm reckons is ideal for shooting movies as it simulates the look of cinematic film, creating understated colors and rich shadow tones.

Improved performance

The X-T2's autofocus system impressed when we tested it, and Fujifilm has tinkered with AF algorithm on the X-H1 to enhance the performance further. 

For low-light shooting, the phase detection autofocus has been improved by approximately 1.5 stops from 0.5EV to -1.0EV, while the range at minimum aperture has been expanded from f/8 to f/11. This should enhance performance when using the camera with teleconverters and lenses like the XF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR, as phase-detection autofocus can now be used.

Fujifilm also reckons it's improved the AF-C performance for the X-H1, which should see better results when shooting finely-detailed surface textures, wild birds and wild animals. 

The X-H1 is capable of shooting at up to 14fps (with the electronic shutter) and 8fps with the mechanical shutter. The dedicated VPB-XH1 battery grip enhances the performance though, increasing the burst speed of the X-H1 to 11fps (with the mechanical shutter), while the NP-W126S battery should deliver 310 shots.

The Fujifilm X-H1 will be available from March, priced at $1899.95 / £1,699 (body-only) or $2199.95 / £1,949 with the VPB-XH1 battery grip in the UK. Australian pricing is still to be confirmed.

Posted: February 15, 2018, 5:00 am

Fujifilm has just taken the wraps of the X-H1, its new flagship X Series camera. So how does the X-H1 compare to the fabulous X-T2, a camera that it sits above in the Fujifilm range? 

Both share the same 24.3MP X-Trans CMOS III sensor, so which camera is the one for you? Let's take a look at some of the key differences. 

X-H1 vs X-T2: In-body image stabilization

While the X-T2 relies on specific lenses for image stabilization (those designated OIS), the X-H1 for the first time in a X Series camera features in-body image stabilization, that promises to offer up to an impressive 5.5-stop compensation. 

X-H1 vs X-T2: Viewfinder and rear screen

The X-T2's electronic viewfinder impressed when we tested it, but the X-H1 is that bit better. While both are the same size at 0.5-inches roughly, the X-H1's resolution of 3.69-million dots is an improvement over the X-T2's already impressive 2.36-million dots. 

Interestingly, the 0.75x magnification offered on the X-H1 is a slight regression on the X-T2's 0.77x magnification, but both have a display lag time of just 0.005 seconds and a refresh rate of 100fps. The minor difference here is that the X-T2 achieves this frame rate in a Boost mode (and requires the VPB-XT2 battery grip), and would otherwise by running at 60fps.

Both sport a 3.0-inch, 1.04-million dot rear display with a clever three-directional tilting mechanism, but the X-H1 has the advantage of a touchscreen interface. 

X-H1 vs X-T2: Build quality

Just like the X-T2, the X-H1 is dust and water-resistant, as well as being able to operate in temperatures as low as 14°F / -10°C. However, the X-H1 also features 25% thicker magnesium alloy compared to the X-T2, while the camera also features a high quality, scratch-resistant coating.

The X-H1 is a bigger camera overall as well, measuring 139.8mm (W) x 97.3mm (H) x 85.5mm (D) compared to the X-T2's dimension's of 132.5 x 91.8 x 49.2mm, while it's also a little heavier at 673g compared to the X-T2's weight of 507g. 

X-H1 vs X-T2: Controls

The design of the X-H1 is a bit of a departure from the X-T2, and borrows some design elements from the medium format GFX 50S.

The most obvious addition to the X-H1 is a much more pronounced handgrip, while there's now a 1.28-inch LCD on the top of the camera, emulating the design of the GFX 50S and displays key shooting information. This does mean that the handy exposure compensation dial on the X-T2 has disappeared. 

There's also the arrival of a dedicated AF-On button at the rear of the camera for back-button focusing, while the buttons on the rear of the X-H1 have been enlarged and improvements made to the grip of the front and rear command dials.

X-H1 vs X-T2: Autofocus

Both the X-H1 and X-T2 both feature the same hybrid AF system that employs both phase-detection and contrast-detection points.

This sees up to 169 phase-detect points arranged in a large square formation (13 x 13) in the centre of the frame that's supplemented by two grids of 6 x 13 contrast-detect points either side to deliver a total of 325 focusing points across a large area of the frame.

With the X-H1 though, Fujifilm has improved the AF algorithms. This has led to the low-light limit for phase-detection points improved by approximately 1.5 stops from 0.5EV to -1.0EV, while the performance at minimum aperture has also been expanded from f/8 to f/11. For instance, phase-detection AF can now be used when using the XF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR with the a XF2X TC WR teleconverter.  

There's also be major improvements made to the AF-C performance while operating in zoom, which should make the X-H1 more suited to shooting fast moving subjects.

X-H1 vs X-T2: Video

Both the X-H1 and X-T2 offer 4K recording (3840 x 2160), but the X-H1 also offers DCI 4K (4096 x 2160) at up to 24p. The X-H1 also has the edge when capturing Full HD footage, capable of shooting at up to 120p compared to the X-T2's 60p.

Fujifilm's also doubled the bit rate on the X-H1, increasing it from the X-T2's 100Mbps to 200Mbps, while it also offers a 400% dynamic range setting and a ETERNA film simulation mode that simulates cinematic film, creating understated colors and rich shadow tones according to Fujifilm.

X-H1 vs X-T2: Burst shooting speed

While you'd expect the X-H1 to have an advantage here, they're both the same, with a top burst shooting speed of 14fps (with the electronic shutter), dipping to 8fps should opt for the mechanical shutter.

Both see a boost in performance if you attach their respective battery grips, with both the X-H1 and X-T2 capable of shooting at 11fps with the mechanical shutter activated. There's no performance gain if you use the electronic shutter.

X-H1 vs X-T2: Battery

Both cameras use Fujifilm's NP-W126S Li-ion battery (good news if you're planning to have both cameras in your kit bag), but the X-T2 has the slightly better battery life of 340 shots compared to 310 shots for the X-H1. 

This can be attributed to a number things, but perhaps the larger viewfinder and in-body stabilization are going to drain the power of the X-H1 a little more.

Posted: February 15, 2018, 5:00 am

The new Lumix GX9 is the successor to one of the oldest mirrorless cameras in Panasonic's current range, the Lumix GX8.

Aimed at the enthusiast photographer who wants a compact but high-performance camera, the Lumix GX9 features a 20.3MP Micro Four Thirds Digital Live MOS sensor, although it's not quite clear if this is the same sensor as the one in the recently announced Lumix G9

There's no low-pass filter though, and Panasonic believes that the combination of this sensor and the latest Venus Engine image processor, for the best possible lens performance, should deliver natural, high-precision images.

Panasonic is touting the Lumix GX9 as the ideal street camera, and to that end has added a new L.Monochrome D mode Photo Style, which promises to deliver detailed black and white photos with emphasized highlights and shadows. The grain effect can also be fine-tuned in all monochrome modes to tailor the 'street' look.

5-axis stabilization

The Lumix GX9 features a 5-axis Dual I.S. (Image Stabilizer) that combines the 2-axis O.I.S. (Optical Image Stabilizer) of a compatible lens and 5-axis B.I.S. (Body Image Stabilizer), making it possible to use a shutter speed four tops slower than would otherwise be possible and still achieve blur-free shots.

Panasonic has also kitted the GX9 out with a shutter unit that incorporates an electromagnetic drive, which should reduce the risk of shutter shock by approximately 90%, while a Silent Mode switches the shutter from mechanical to electronic and turns all sound (AF, operation) off.

The Lumix GX9 gets an uprated electronic viewfinder that tilts upwards 80 degrees and has a 2.7m-dot equivalent high-resolution display and 0.7x (35mm camera equiv.) magnification.

On the rear of the Lumix GX9 is a 3.0-inch 1240k-dot touchscreen display that also tilts upwards 80 degrees, and down 45 degrees, to make high- and low-angle shooting easier.

The Lumix GX9 features Panasonic's Contrast AF System that includes DFD (Depth From Defocus) technology, which sees the system exchange digital signals between the camera and the lens at 240fps, which in turn is claimed to deliver a focusing speed of 0.07 sec.

The Lumix GX9 features a wide range of AF functions including Face/Eye Detection AF, Pinpoint AF, One-shot AF and advanced Low Light AF. If you're going to be shooting in near-darkness, Live View Boost makes it possible to check composition under these conditions by boosting the sensitivity just for the Live View display.

4K video capture

As you'd expect for a Panasonic camera, 4K video capture is a given (at 30p or 24p in MP4), while there's also 4K PHOTO. Taking advantage of 4K technology, the Lumix GX9 can shoot at 30fps and output 8MP-equivalent images. If you want to shoot at the camera's full 20.3MP resolution, the GX9 can shoot at up to 9fps (AF-S) and 6fps (AF-C). 

Compared to the Lumix GX8, the Lumix GX9 features an exposure compensation dial, and a dedicated focus lever on the rear of the camera for quickly toggling between AF modes. 

The GX9 features Bluetooth Low Energy to enable a constant connection with your smartphone or tablet for instant image sharing, in addition to Wi-Fi.

The Lumix GX9 will be available in early March priced at £699 (body-only) in the UK. In Australia, the Lumix GX9 is available as a single lens kit with a 12-32mm lens costing AU$1,399.  US pricing is still to be confirmed.

Posted: February 13, 2018, 1:00 pm

The Lumix ZS200 (known as the Lumix TZ200 / TZ220 outside the US) is the latest travel zoom compact camera from Panasonic, and one which the company hopes will continue its stranglehold on this growing market. 

Panasonic pretty much invented the travel zoom camera genre – that is, compact cameras that you can fit in a pocket but which have long zoom lenses built-in – with the current Lumix ZS100 (TZ100 / TZ110) our pick of the bunch right now.

The company isn't resting on its laurels though, and has extended its range further with the Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220, with the company stressing that the ZS100 / TZ100 / TZ110 continues in the lineup.

15x optical zoom

Perhaps the biggest difference between the new Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220 and the ZS100 / TZ100 / TZ110 is the zoom range on offer. While the ZS100 / TZ100 / TZ110 managed to squeeze in a 10x optical zoom with a range of 25-250mm and a maximum available aperture of f/2.8-5.9, the ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220 incorporates a 15x optical zoom with a coverage of 24-360mm and a maximum aperture of f/3.3-6.4; a touch wider at the start of the zoom range then (though with a slightly narrower/slower maximum aperture), but noticeably more reach at the long end. 

The new lens design enables the Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220 to focus down to 3cm to enable the capture of close-up macro shots.

With such a large 15x zoom, there's also Panasonic's Power OIS stabilization system on hand to counteract camera shake for stills photography, and five-axis hybrid OIS stabilization for video.

What made the ZS100 / TZ100 / TZ110 unique among travel zoom compacts was its relatively large 1-inch sensor, which is some four times larger than those in most rival cameras (such sensors are normally found in premium compacts like Sony's RX100 V and Panasonic's own Lumix LX10 / LX15), and the Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 /TZ220 features a similar 20.1MP 1-inch sensor.

The Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220 can shoot in raw (as well as JPEG), and it's no surprise to see 4K video capture up to 30p, while Panasonic's 4K PHOTO mode lets users extract single frames from 4K burst files shot at 30fps and save them as 8MP equivalent images. 

Enhanced handling

While the inclusion of a built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF) on the ZS100 / TZ100 / TZ110 was certainly welcome, its modest resolution let it down a bit. The Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220 retains an EVF, but gets a decent boost in resolution, from 1.17m dots to an impressive 2.3m. It's also a little larger at 0.21 inches (compared to 0.2 inches on the ZS100 / TZ100 / TZ110), and offers slightly better magnification of 0.53x compared to 0.45x. These improvements should make framing shots in bright ambient light that much easier.

The ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220 also has a large 3-inch touchscreen on the rear. As you'd expect, there's a sensor which detects when the camera is held to the eye and automatically switches off the main screen and activates the EVF.

The body design has also been refined. The smooth grip, which came in for some criticism on the ZS100 / TZ100 / TZ110, now has a textured lip that's designed to provide a more solid feel in the hand.  

The Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220 features a newly adopted eco30fps mode, which reduces the Live View refresh rate, and which should see the camera good for around 370 shots (if you're using the rear LCD) per charge. The battery can be charged via AC or USB.

Like many recent cameras, the Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220 features a Bluetooth Low Energy connection to enable a consistent connection with a smartphone or tablet with minimum power consumption, alongside the usual Wi-Fi connectivity.

The Lumix ZS200 / TZ200 / TZ220 will be available in early March (April in Australia), in graphite silver or black finishes, and is priced at $799.99 / £729 / AU$1,199.

Posted: February 13, 2018, 1:00 pm
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10 FREE 3D printed Gadgets for Photographers

By: Mathieu Stern

Published on Feb 7, 2018

►You can find all the free models i speak about here :
Photo background : https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:101…
Sony rear Lens cap : https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:753741
Front cap : https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:110870
mountain sd card holder : https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:149…
Framing spiral : http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1358472
Screw mount : https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:578514
Fujian lens hood : https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:258…
Lens cap holder : https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:276…
Kiev 10-15 adapter for Helios 60 : http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1464062
Lithophane : http://3dp.rocks/lithophane/

►Learn more about the cheap Cetus 3D printer :
https://www.cetus3d.com

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WAJDA PHOTO – Film vs. Digital Photographers: Is There a Difference?

By: Kenneth Wajda

Published on Dec 27, 2017

WAJDA PHOTO – Film vs. Digital Photographers: Is There a Difference?

Photo Walk Folks: https://roystryker.wordpress.com/2017…

To support me as a patron with a contribution, even just $1 or $2 a month: https://www.patreon.com/kennethwajda – Many Thanks!

Shop at Adorama and support this channel: http://adorama.evyy.net/c/266353/5192

My Commercial Photography site: http://KennethWajda.com
Film Portraiture site: http://TheFilmPhotographer.com
The Wise Photo Project : http://TheWisePhotoProject.com
Elderly Photo Visits: http://ElderlyPhotoVisits.com
Street View: http://ColoradoFaces.com
6×6 Blog: http://6x6portraits.com
My Video Production site: http://DenverBoulderVideo.com

 

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8 Cinematic LUTs Pack by Mathieu Stern ( ZOOLOGY)

By: Mathieu Stern

Originally published on Jan 8, 2018

►► Download the LUTs here: https://www.mathieustern.com/luts/

8 High Quality Cinematic LUTs That I Created and use all the time
Compatible with Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Photoshop, After Effects, Davinci Resolve, FCPX*

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▲▲ WHERE I GET MY MUSIC  ▲▲ AMAZING for YouTubers
https://goo.gl/R8dSUu

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▲ WHERE TO FIND ME ▲

►I N S T A G R A M : https://www.instagram.com/mathieustern/
►T W I T E R: http://twitter.com/Mathieustern
►F A C E B O O K : https://goo.gl/gKSJwC
►REDDIT : https://www.reddit.com/r/MathieuStern/

Please support me and my experiments on Patreon :
https://goo.gl/eUQ9ZY

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New to my Channel?? Here are some playlists to get you started.

➜ Best Of – Watch These First : https://goo.gl/pC31Ae

➜ The Weird Lens Challenge : https://goo.gl/F14AmC

➜ The Cheap Weird Lens Reviews : https://goo.gl/4Esi2p

➜ How To / Tutorials : https://goo.gl/mMZlTk.

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Nikon D850: Hercules Rising

By: Nikon Asia

Originally published on Nov 21, 2017

Shot exclusively on the #Nikon #D850 by photographer Marsel van Oosten, Hercules Rising is an epic 8K UHD time-lapse masterpiece.

Experience the magic, day or night with 45-megapixel images in phenomenal detail with minimal noise.

Discover the advanced features of the D850 here:
http://nikn.ly/D850play

Note: This 4K UHD data was downconverted from an 8K time-lapse movie produced* with 45-megapixel still images captured using the interval timer mode on the D850 for viewing on the social networking sites.

*Requires third party software.

Behind Hercules

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Nikon D850 VS D500 Using the Nikkor 200-500 – Osprey Feeding Frenzy

By: Mark Smith

Published on Nov 30, 2017

I take my D850, my D500 and the Nikkor 200-500 out in search of feeding osprey and I find them. I wanted to see which camera handled the fast action of these birds.

Bird Photography Workshops: http://floridabirdtours.com/index.php…

Private Photography Instruction: http://floridabirdtours.com/index.php…

Grab a copy of my book on bird photography using the link below.
AMAZON PRINT: http://amzn.to/2fKFtBp

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